Lamb Knit Goods Company

Lamb Knit Goods Company

From The Colon Express, April 5, 1895: “About six years ago I. W. Lamb, a man who is known all over the world as the inventor of the Lamb Knitting Machine, came to Colon with a proposition to establishing a factory for manufacturing gloves and mittens with an improved machine. Some of the prominent businessmen of Colon took hold of the matter and made an effort to form a stock company. Little was imagined of the real results of this effort. Hopes were high and some moderate castles were built in the air, but the hopes have all been more than fulfilled and the castles have been found to have a foundation on financial rock. The growth has been solid and sure under the present management.

 

 

The cutting room at Lamb Knit Goods

 

The first two or three years, like all new ventures, it was not a paying investment, but the goods, now recognized to be the best on earth, had to be introduced, and the foundations well laid before the superstructure could be erected. The president of the company, Charles Clement, is one of the substantial businessmen of the town, and conducts a general store on State Street in the finest double block in this section. Mr. Clement is also a fancier of fine horses and drives some well-known steppers. Edwin R. Hill, secretary and treasurer, is a man well fitted for the position. President of the Exchange Bank, his wide experience in money matters has enabled him to pilot the finances of this concern safely among the rocks of disaster when other wrecks were all about. Thomas J. Hill, the superintendent, under whose management the Colon knitting mills have emerged from a doubtful to an assured success, is just the man for the place, his ability along this line having been so fully demonstrated that the board of directors have reelected him to succeed himself each year and will undoubtedly continue to do so. Mrs. O. K. S. Leland, the assistant superintendent, is one who has been in the employ of the company from the first, and cannot be excelled as a bookkeeper and understands perfectly the minor details of the business.

 

 

 

Colon, the beautiful city by the lakes, is proud of her industry and well she may be, for it is the largest manufactory of high-grade gloves and mittens in the world. Other institutions have been organized and have put imitations of the Lamb Knit Goods on the market but they have only succeeded in making an inferior article and more firmly establishing the reputation of the Colon mills. Each succeeding year has found the factory unable to keep pace with the demand for goods and each year new additions have been made. This year there will be sixty machines running in the knitting room with 500 hands on the pay roll. Every day the superintendent is receiving inquiries from dealers in regard to goods, fearing they may not be able to get them for another season. The traveling men will start out earlier this season taking the road in April and ten men will be employed instead of six heretofore in this capacity. The best stock, silk, saxony and Australians, coupled with the best expert workmanship have made a very enviable reputation for this institution.”